Interview with Canadian Band: One in the Chamber

Interviews, Music
Photo Credit: Keelan Nightingale

By Monica Ng

I’ve seen One in the Chamber’s name mentioned here and there on social media, but most recently through Sara Sunshine (IG: @sara_sunshine_meredith) and Canadian band Stuck on Planet Earth’s (IG: @stuckonplanetearth) posts/stories. I figured that I should take some time to listen to their music – afterall, Toronto has some wicked musicians.

Upcoming concerts:

October 30, 2021 – Halloween Rock N Eve (Fundraising concert in support of frontline workers at Hamilton Health Sciences Foundation)

November 16, 2021 – The Rose Brampton (with Stuck on Planet Earth)

Contact

IG: @oitcband

FB: @oitcband

www.oitcband.com

Music

Blow (single) – 2020

To the Gallows (single) – 2020

I’ve Got Something to Say (EP) – 2018 – Crooked Step, Bills to Pay, The Ballad of Captain Jack, Something to Say and Itchin’ Back

The Boston Session: Bootleg Demos – 2017

Photo credit: Keelan Nightingale

About

This self-described dirty rock ‘n roll Toronto-based band is made up of Mike Biase (lead vocals/rhythm guitar), Cecil Eugene (lead guitar/backing vocals), Christian Dotto (bass) and Gerrod Harris (drums). One in the Chamber (“OITC”) is on a roll with over 20,000 Spotify streams, more than 10,000 followers on social media, and their album “I’ve Got Something to Say” being named as “Canadian EP of the Year” following its release by Canadian Beats and their readers.

Interview

Me: I’m delighted to have this opportunity to get to know the four of you. You guys are LOUD and banging – I love it! I admit that I haven’t been listening much to heavier rock lately, but I think I’m ready for some head banging. What I like about rock ‘n roll is that you can just let go of everything and ride the music. The pandemic has affected so many industries, but now that things are opening up again here in Toronto – let’s hear it…How was Voodo Rockfest?

Gerrod: Thanks for having us! Voodoo Rockfest was unreal. It was amazing to be back on stage and to see so many of our friends in other bands for the first time in almost two years.

Christian: Nice to meet you, Monica! Thanks for having us!

Me: Pleasure’s mine! And thanks for taking the time out of your busy schedules for this interview. You guys are really great with social media. When I first followed you, I got a DM asking what made me follow you with links to your socials. I find that music is a whole new experience when you have an opportunity to interact with musicians through commenting and DMs.  That being said, I can imagine that managing your socials is a full-time job in itself.  With over 10K followers, how do you manage and where do you draw the line between band life and your personal lives?

Gerrod: We try to keep it as professional and in tone with the band as much as possible. We have so much going on that we never feel that we need to post about our personal lives. It’s nice having the separation.

Christian: It really is a pleasure to connect with these people. We’ve met some of the most amazing fans and some truly cool musicians this way.

Me: I posted on my social media that I fell in love with your softer song Just for Tonight. It may sound weird, but it IS possible to fall in love with a song. I’ve only experienced this feeling twice in my life – the first time was Lewis Capaldi’s song Someone You Loved. If I try to describe it, I would say that your song has this way of wrapping itself around me and carrying me in such an intangible emotional way.  It’s been on repeat for a while now. So, thank you for this beautiful song. What inspires your music and your latest singles Blow and To the Gallows?

Mike: I generally write lyrics first. I always keep a notebook or paper around and I have pages and pages of lyrics written about whatever comes to mind. Sometimes I would end up writing music to them. For lyrics my inspiration has generally come from what is going on in my life (songs like Just for Tonight or Bills to Pay). Since being in OITC though, I’ve found that I like hearing the music first, and writing lyrics that come from the song. That was the case with songs like Blow and To the Gallows. The music has its own emotion and the words come out of it. I still write a lot in my books, but I find I’m also writing guitar licks and lines more often now, such as Itchin’ Back, and then putting lyrics in once we’ve written the music.

Christian: Wow! Thank you for the compliment! Just for Tonight (Stay) is a song that we recorded in Boston with former Bang Tango guitarist, Scott LaFlamme. The bassline that I wrote was inspired by an idea that Scott had given me at the time and was far more interesting than what I was playing during rehearsals. Blow and To the Gallows were written in a more organic way than Just for Tonight (Stay) was. Mike immediately expressed how the riff was too heavy, so he started messing around with it on his guitar and eventually created the main riff that you hear in the song. The original riff was still salvaged though, as that is what Cecil plays in the first verse of the song!

Me: It’s nice to hear the story behind my favourite song. Congratulations – I read that you guys recently made it to the semi-finals in 97.7 HTZ FM’s annual Rocksearch competition. How did you get involved in the competition and what’s the story behind how you guys formed as a band?

Gerrod: It really meant a lot to us to be recognized by 97.7 in 2020’s Rocksearch. It is a Canadian institution that has promoted some of the coolest bands to come out of our country for the last two decades and it was amazing to have been a part of that.

Cecil: The band formed in 2015. At the time, the band I was playing with was in the midst of breaking up, so I decided to get a bunch of guys together to start a rock/hard rock band. I knew Mike from the pub I worked at, which was at York University. We had played a few gigs together before, so when I saw him waiting in line on pub night, I asked him if he wanted to start a band, and so we were the first two members of OITC. I hosted jazz nights at the pub and one night Gerrod subbed in as a drummer for a group that I booked regularly. The guitarist in the group worked at the pub as well and gave me Gerrod’s number, saying he was looking for a rock band, so I gave him a call. We met up at one of the university’s music rooms and the three of us jammed the early stages of Bills to Pay. One night, I was talking to my brother, telling him we were still searching for a bass player. He told me to message Chris because he was also looking for a band and played bass. After a few months, we decided to name the band One in the Chamber and played our first gig at The Valley Bar and Grill in Mississauga.

Me: I love those stories…how destiny brought you together! I’m sure you get asked this all the time – how did you choose your band’s name? I stumbled upon another rock band with the same name while checking out your music.  How can fans avoid confusion on this front?

Gerrod: I’m sorry to the hear that! To my understanding, we are the only active band with the name, but follow us on our socials and website to see everything from us firsthand.

Christian: It actually took us about a month to finally decide on a band name. We had close to ten ideas that we’d narrowed down to a top three, and finally agreed that One in the Chamber was the name for us.

Gerrod: One in the Chamber is about making your one shot count.

Me: Cheers to first shots! I enjoy hearing how musicians first get into music. When did you guys pick up your first instrument and what other instruments do you play?

Mike: My dad used to listen to Q107 every morning taking us to school, so I started listening to rock music at a young age. My mum played guitar as well so I was surrounded by music all the time. I played trumpet in band in elementary school and picked up guitar when I was 12.

Gerrod: I grew up with music playing in my house all the time, but I started playing the drums in the seventh grade. Since then, I’ve learnt a little guitar but drums have always been my passion.

Christian: I also grew up around music. My parents would always have rock and metal music playing in the house and on car rides. When I was about 13 years old, I got my first electric guitar and picked up the drums and bass guitar in high school.

Me: Wow, your houses were rocking! Sounds like music is in your blood. As you may know, I interview musicians (mostly Canadian because I’m a huge supporter of my fellow Canadians) out of pure passion. What I love is that I have a chance to ask my questions and learn about them and what drives them. If you had to describe yourself in 2- 3 words, what would they be?

Gerrod: Dirty, rock and roll.

Mike: Hairy, hard hitting.

Me: That’s so funny and most awesome! I would have never expected those descriptions. I’ve received feedback from previous interviews that it’s really hard to pick 3 favourite musicians, but to get a feel for where you’re coming from – who are yours?

Mike: Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, Eddie Van Halen.

Gerrod: If we’re talking drummers, I’d say John Bonham, Chad Smith and Danny Carrey.

Christian: That is a tough one. I’m going to narrow it down, like Gerrod, and stick to bass players – Cliff Burton, Geezer Butler and Geddy Lee.

Me: I like getting answers to this question because I get to discover more musicians. You guys are so personable and down-to-earth. I would imagine that those traits are assets in the music industry. Any advice for anyone starting their music careers?

Gerrod: Be kind, actively pay attention to the business side and never stop learning.

Christian: Also be genuine. People can see right through you if you’re being pretentious or trying too hard. If you’re doing what you love, just have fun with it!

Mike: Leave your heart and soul on stage every time you play.

Me: Love it guys. It’s been great chatting and I look forward to seeing you guys in concert.

Everyone – don’t forget to follow these rocking dudes on socials and check out their music. 

Guys, is there anything you wish to share before we wrap things up?

Christian: Thanks again for having us, Monica. See you around!

Gerrod: Thank you for your time! Hope to see you at a show soon!

—End—

Here are some videos to enjoy!

Interview with Canadian musician Jake Feeney

Interviews, Music
Photo credit: Julia Colangelo

Vegan. Toronto. Musician. Three words that caught my interest and prompted this interview. I “met” Jake on the Toronto Vegan Facebook group. He posted asking if anyone knew of any vegan restaurants where he could play live. Of course, I had to check out his music right away! I have to be honest, folk-alternative music is not really my style, but Jake’s songs are beautiful and heartfelt. His latest single, Evaporate is really nice.

Contact 

IG: @jakefeeney

FB: @jakefeeneymusic 

www.jakefeeney.com 

His Music 

Evaporate (Single) – 2021

Sunrise (Single) – 2021 

Pipe Dreams (Album) – 2020: Pipe Dreams, We Used to Float, Memoria, Jane, I’ll Get Halfway, Mooring, Ageless Storm and The Hall. 

Calling Cards (Single) – 2020 

No Headlights (Single) – 2019 

About 

From Toronto, Jake is a singer, songwriter, guitar player and music producer. He produces his music in his bedroom studio and enjoys performing in front of live audiences. Jake had an early start in music – with his first recording at age 8 in his father’s home studio. At age 18, he won a finalist award in RBC’s Emerging Artists program. 

Photo credit: Julia Colangelo

Interview 

Me: Jake, thanks for taking the time to participate in this interview. You paint a very nostalgic picture recording your own music in your father’s studio. I read online that your father is a country music producer, so it seems like music is in your blood. Can you share one of your favourite memories in the studio as a child? 

Jake: Thank YOU for doing this, it’s my pleasure to answer your thoughtful questions. Music has definitely been at the forefront of my life since I was born. My dad Joel did a lot of his work in his home studio, so I would have to say my favourite memory would be sitting on the carpet in the room next to the studio, playing with Lego and mini sticks. My dad has mentioned that the sound of me rummaging through the Lego box showed up in some of his recordings. Not sure if these takes made the cut, but those were lovely times. 

Me: I can totally picture you sitting there. I would imagine that the sound of shifting Lego blocks would be edited out lol. You’re one of my younger interviewees. Congratulations on winning a finalist award at the RBC’s Emerging Artists program. I’m happy that programs like these exist because they give musicians an opportunity to showcase their talent. How did you get involved with the program and what are your plans (including new music) going forward? 

Jake: Thank you! I’m happy that they exist too, and I honestly didn’t know about this one until they contacted me. The principal at my high school (Etobicoke School of the Arts), Rob Mackinnon, had submitted my music to RBC and that’s how I got involved. I am so grateful he did, because I think that experience gave me a lot of confidence and excitement about a career in music. My plans are to simply keep creating music that is authentic to me. I am also becoming more involved in other projects like writing for others and session work. The goal has always been to inspire others like my heroes do for me – so however I can do that, I will.

Me: Sounds like you have a great plan mapped out. I like the distinctive sound of your fingerstyle guitar. I read on your website that you’re a self-learned guitar player. When did you pick up your first guitar and do you play any other instruments? 

Jake: I picked up guitar around 13 after playing piano as a kid. I dabble with bass guitar and love to still play piano when I’m around one, but guitar is my main squeeze – I can’t get enough. I would play as many hours as I possibly could when I was younger and had fewer responsibilities. Being late or half asleep in high school because I stayed up too late playing guitar, was a very real thing. Discovering John Mayer and his playing was a huge inspiration to me.

Me: What, sleeping in class? Unheard of lol. Well, you certainly had a good reason for it. My favourite song of yours is “Calling Cards”.  It’s hard to explain, but somehow it takes me back to a less complicated time in my life. What is the source of your musical inspiration for your songwriting and style? 

Jake: That’s really nice, I love the different effects songs have on people. Songwriting came first, likely because I wanted to be like my dad. When I discovered guitar, I felt like I found my instrument and the right way to deliver my songs. I like to write songs about my life, but ones that can be interpreted individually. That’s why I don’t like to label a song as specifically about this or that. I think that’s why I love slightly more impressionistic songwriters, like Bon Iver and Gregory Alan Isakov. I’ve always gravitated toward mellow, melodic and emotion-heavy songs. That kind of expression is what comes naturally to me, so I try to embrace it as much as I can. 

Me: That’s one of the things I love about music – people can interpret the same song totally differently. For me, certain songs are emotionally loaded and take me back to a specific moment in time. As someone with stage fright, I really admire your confidence to perform in front of crowds. Do you get stage fright? And what kind of challenges have you come across promoting yourself and your music? 

Jake: I do get stagefright. Maybe a little less each time, but I’ve never not felt it on the day of a performance. I like the nerves though, because I think it means I care, and want to do a good job up there. After the first song, a lot of it dissipates. 

Promoting yourself as an indie musician is definitely challenging, and there are a lot of amazing musicians fighting the same fight. Sometimes I feel like the biggest challenge is trying to find your own angle. A lot of the time it feels like the music isn’t enough, and that you need a compelling story to really cut through the noise. While I do agree that this helps, I think it still comes down to writing a good song that will speak for itself. So more often, the biggest challenge is writing that song. 

Me: I can appreciate how hard it is for musicians to find their spot on a highly competitive metaphorical “world stage”. I agree that staying true to yourself and your style is important. In your case it definitely comes through. It’s obvious from your posts that you are smitten by your girlfriend Julia (who happens to be on the singles cover of “Sunrise”). In one of your posts, you wrote “my crush on her grows embarrassingly bigger and bigger every day.” Awww…young love is so sweet.  Did you write any songs specifically for her? And does she ever sing along with you? 

Jake: Absolutely I’ve written songs for Julia. It’s hard not to. She does sing along with me! She is a very talented singer and I’ve heard some beautiful songs that she’s written. We sing covers together a lot, and it always leaves me smiling.

Me: Amazing to have a partner in crime! If you had to pick one of your songs – which one holds the most meaning for you and why? 

Jake: I think it changes – but right now, my newest song Evaporate definitely holds the most meaning to me. I think it’s because it came from an honest and vulnerable place, and it’s about feelings I deal with constantly. It’s a reminder to me that it’s okay to let go of a thought. This is something I need frequent reminding of.

Me: It’s amazing that from vulnerability comes beautiful music. Letting go of things is something that I write about often. Music shapes and influences us in so many ways. Here’s my usual “get to know you” question: who are your top 3 favourite musicians? 

Jake: This is very tough… but I’ll try to narrow it to 3, in no particular order:

1. John Mayer
2. The Tallest Man on Earth
3. Frank Ocean 

Me: Frank Ocean and Thom Yorke are probably the most popular fav musicians named by the other musicians I have interviewed so far. Pandemic life has changed people’s lives in so many ways. What are your plans now that things are finally opening up? 

Jake: I am slowly getting back to performing here in Toronto, which feels great. My rule has always been to say yes to every gig (if it’s feasible) so I will continue to do that, and hopefully the ball will keep rolling. I’m also recording and working on releasing more new songs.   

Me: Amazing! I know this is a music interview, but it stemmed from your vegan group post, and I get really excited when I meet a fellow vegan. I’m glad that there is a huge global movement right now towards ending animal cruelty and saving the planet. This November marks my 3rd veganversary. You mentioned that you’ve been vegan about 2 years.  What’s the story behind why you became vegan? 

Jake: I’m glad there is too. It feels like I came into it during a big surge, which is very exciting. Julia had a lot to do with me switching to a plant-based diet – but not through persuasion, just education. I was inspired by her and I learned so many things that changed my perspective. The switch was a bit gradual at first, but as I learned more, I became more passionate about the movement. Now it seems being vegan is a no-brainer for me, personally.

Me:  Cheers to a more compassionate world! Jake, it was great getting to know you. Thanks again for your time.  Hopefully, I’ll catch you performing when I’m out enjoying vegan food. Is there anything else you’d like to share? 

Everyone – check out Jake’s music and support local Canadian music!  

Jake: Thank you so much for doing this interview! I’d love to see you out at a show. The support you give to upcoming artists is so valuable and admirable, and it goes a long way. I hope your readers can find something that speaks to them in my music. 

—End— 

Here are some of Jake’s audio videos

Interview with Spain’s Jacqueline Loor

Interviews, Music
Photo credit: Hector Socorro

By Monica Ng

Jacqueline’s Debut Album “Show Them” comes out Friday October 1, 2021!

Pre-save or buy her digital album by clicking here: https://ffm.to/jacquelineloor_showthem

Finding of a gem

I know – this is my third non-Canadian musician interview. What’s going on? Well, my heart was brimming with raw emotion listening to Jacqueline’s music – I just had to share it with you. Social media is a fascinating thing. A bit of backstory how I discovered her – a while back I clicked on The Moon & I’s sponsored Instagram link which led to an interview with Eric Nguyen of The Moon & I, who’s from my hometown Montreal. I’m always looking for new music and curious what others listen to, so I admit that I checked out a few musicians from Eric’s page. And lucky that I did!

Contact

Instagram: @jacquelineloormusic

Facebook: jloormusic

www.jacquelineloor.com

Music  

Alternative pop

Burn it Down – single (2021) – placed in CW’s television show Batwoman

Carry Through – single (2021)

I Broke My Heart – single (2021)

Find Your Way – single (2020) will be on a Christmas Film “Magic in Mount Holly” on November 1st on Pureflix

Just a Memory – single (2020)

If I Could Go Back – single (2020)

Just Let Me Breathe – single (2020)

Don’t You Pretend – Album (2020): Don’t You Pretend, It’s Not on Me, Coming Undone and Coming Undone (Semblance Remix)

Deshacer (Spanish version of Coming Undone) – single (2020)

About

Jacqueline is a singer, songwriter, guitar and piano player from Miami, Florida. According to Jacqueline, she moved to Spain because “That’s where my family is from. My grandfather is from Tenerife, Spain. He moved to Cuba as an adult where my mother was born. My mother had to escape Cuba when she was 4 years old when Fidel Castro took everything away from her family. She went to Tenerife a few years ago on vacation and felt she belonged there. As soon as she said she was moving, I knew I would follow her wherever she would go. The island is really special and it’s where I found the courage to pursue my true passion – songwriting. I didn’t even know I could sing until I happened to bump into a music school here in Tenerife, and decided to take some lessons. I was 36 at the time and even though I’ve always wanted to sing, I thought I couldn’t. As soon as I started to learn what my instrument could do, I worked crazy hard everyday to train my voice, and one door after another started opening up. It was as if the universe was saying, “Yes”! I find peace and inspiration for my music on this island.”

In her spare time, Jacqueline enjoys experimenting with music production. Her enthusiam translates into everything she does, “I am diving more into music production with the help of my incredible female mentor, Kris Bradley. I always thought I couldn’t produce music, but one of the tracks on my album I actually produced, “I Broke My Heart”. It’s just the beginning for my production career!”

Jacqueline Loor
Photo credit: Hector Socorro

Interview

Me: Jacqueline, I’m so happy you agreed to this interview. I’m grateful for this opportunity to chat with you. You’re incredibly multi-talented, open and enthusiastic. I mentioned that your spirit reminds me of Canadian musician AARYS. Your soulful and expressive voice has already made its way into my bones and gives me the chills – in a good way of course.

I’m hooked on If I Could Go Back and Find Your Way. I love the progression of the music in If I Could Go Back leading up to the powerful upbeat chorus – it’s like all of our inner struggles disappear and we are strong and resilient against the odds. Your voice in some of your songs is both haunting and uplifting at the same time. Find Your Way is one of those fun songs where you kick off your shoes, lift your arms up to the sky and dance – and the kind of song you play full blast while hanging out with girlfriends. 

Congratulations – Burn it Down was placed in CW’s television show Batwoman.  Well done – I love it…what a gorgeous dark cinematic song.  You’re on a roll – this is the third song you’ve released this year.  I Broke My Heart and Carry Through are your other two new releases. You are on fire! Since I wrote up this interview, you released even more songs and you’re about to launch your first album. Congratulations on that as well.

You mentioned that I Broke My Heart is your first self-produced song – how long did it take you to produce the song, and can you describe your learning experience along the way? 

Jacqueline: It took me about two months to produce. I took Kris Bradley’s course “Produce Like a Boss – Voice Memo to Demo” and after doing one track that may never see the light of day, I decided to produce a song I wrote, “I Broke My Heart”. My other female mentor, Shelly Mcerlaine who guided me while I was in The Songwriting Academy really pushed me to produce this track. These two female mentors have pushed me out of my own way and made me realize that I CAN produce music if I put my mind to it. 

Me: That’s so inspiring! I completely agree that often it’s thinking that we can’t do something that holds us back. Once we set our mind to something, who knows what can be accomplished? When did you learn to play the piano and guitar?

Jacqueline: I learned to play guitar at 18, and piano I just started teaching myself a year ago! I always wrote poetry since I was a little girl chasing after dumb boys! LOL! Reading and writing have been a huge part of my life and that came in handy when it came to songwriting.

Me: Impressive and great visual about a girl chasing boys…haha. I really admire musicians. I can’t play instruments or sing, so my musical career was over before it began. But I’ve always loved listening to music. What was your “defining” moment when you knew that you would become a musician?  

Jacqueline: I was playing one of my songs to my friend here in Tenerife and he said, “Why don’t you have any of these beautiful songs on Spotify?” That’s when I said, “Yeah, why don’t I?” As soon as I had that idea, I was a freight train on a mission and dedicated so much energy and time to music and honing my craft.

Me: I love it – a freight train on a mission. I have those moments too, when I know there’s something I want and I go for it. You sing so beautifully in English and Spanish. What inspires your music?  

Jacqueline: My identical twin has been my Muse. I adore her and so much of who I am is because of her. She has had a tough journey in life and I’ve always tried to help her along the way. Sometimes or often times she doesn’t like to listen to me so I decided to write songs about it! I also realized that I’ve been in similar tough relationships and had to find the strength to get out. I’m hoping my music helps other people find their strength.

Me: A sibling who doesn’t listen? Unheard of, lol. Your songs are very inspirational. If I Could Go Back gave me a lot of strength at the time I needed it. I love the lyrics “lessons I have learned/take them with me/where I go I know I’ll be ok…If I could go back/I would have walked out that door…”

Based on my previous music interviews, I know that musicians have been hit hard during this COVID-19 pandemic. But some of them brought up a few positive things that came out of it – they had a chance to develop their social media presence and more time to produce new music or experiment with music production/styles. What were you doing just before the first lockdown?

Jacqueline: I had just moved back to Miami for a year to help out with some family matters, and in that time I formed a band! I always dreamt of being in a band so when I was playing an open mic one night in South Miami, a guy, Gio, came up to me and said he wanted to be my drummer. I thought he was crazy but I said, “Yes!” Where there is a will there is a way Monica, and we had a band in no time. We were playing all over Miami, and having such a good time doing it! I played at some great local music venues there like Bar Nancy which I truly love, and Churchill’s which is where I used to go to when I was a kid to watch bands play. Las Rosas is also another spot I love, and it was the last show we played right when lockdown happened.

Me: What a great story of the impromtu formation of your band! You must know this question is coming…what is it like to have a twin sister and what’s the most mischievous “swap” that you ever did?

Jacqueline: Lol! Yeah, of course I knew this one was coming! We’ve done a ton of mischievous things growing up. My favorite is the first one. I was in kindergarten and of course I was the more daring one and came up with the idea to switch. My twin definitely did not want to do it but I talked her into it. We were crazy identical at the time, and the teacher had us in assigned seats with our names taped onto the desk, and we even sat on the other side of the room from each other. The teacher asked a question, and I raised my hand at which point she calls on me and calls me Caroline. I am blown away at that moment realizing this all has worked. Then the teacher asked another question and when my twin raises her hand, the teacher says, “Yes Jacqueline,” my twin started crying and says, “I’m not Jacqueline, I’m Caroline!” The teacher infuriated and staring at me screams, “What, that means you’re JACQUELINE?!” I respond calmly, “I don’t know what she’s talking about, I’m not Jacqueline, I’m Caroline.” LOL! 

Me: Too funny, but I feel bad for Caroline. Don’t hold back Jacqueline – tell us more about your song Show Them and new album.

Jacqueline:  Show Them is a song I wrote on my own. It was meant to empower people to be who they are. I feel one of the best things I have learned in life is to be who I truly am, instead of who I’m “supposed to be”. I hope this song empowers people to be true to themselves – a message I always try to give my two girls. I even had them sing on the chorus, which really meant the world to me because so much of what I do is for them. I want the album to leave people inspired. I hope it gives them strength to accept what’s going on, not pretend it’s something it’s not and realize they have the strength to get out of it…and at the end of it, realize that they’re amazing just the way they are.

Me: Girl power and self-empowerment are definitely conveyed in your music. Self-love is so important and I think that too many people have self-doubt and don’t love themselves enough. I really look forward to more music from you. The world needs to “feel” and release raw emotion rather than keep feelings bottled up. I have your album pre-saved already. Everyone – add Jacqueline’s music to your music collection and let her voice and lyrics propel you into believing in yourself and loving yourself first. And as usual, remember…following people on socials is FREE! Give Jacqueline a follow. Jacqueline, is there anything else that you wish to add?

Jacqueline: I just filmed the music video for “Show Them” in the forest here in Tenerife. I’m super excited about it because the song is a female empowerment track and I had both my daughters in it along with their closest girlfriends. It was definitely a day I think all of us will never forget 🙂

—End—

Here are some videos:

Interview with Jordan Waraksa of Milwaukee’s band: SONOf

Interviews, Music
SONOf
Photo credit: SONOf

By Monica Ng

It’s a new world. Following someone on Instagram isn’t tacky or weird (unless of course, it’s weird). In fact, it’s a great way for people to connect with others locally and across the globe – and for musicians, it represents free promo and a chance to grow their audience. Had SONOf not followed me, I probably wouldn’t have known about their music.  I love it when musicians post their video clips on social media. You get a chance to sample a variety of music just by clicking – it’s like someone bringing a wine taste-testing right to your door. That would be awesome. Did I just start a new trend?!

Contact

www.sonof.us

IG: @sonof.music

FB: sonof sonof

About

From Milwaukee, USA, Jordan Waraksa, Nick Waraksa, Chuck Lawton and Benjamin Schaefer are the guys behind SONOf.  Their project was created out of their desire to explore and experiment with electronic music this past decade, as they shifted away from acoustic music. Their self-titled EP was born during the COVID pandemic.

Their Music

SONOf EP (2021) – Stoaway, Ligh+ and bTT.

Brume (2020) – Single

Interview

Me: Jordan, thanks so much for taking the time for this interview.  Congratulations, on the release of SONOf’s new EP!  I love the artistic touch that you guys put into everything, including your song titles (example, use of “+” instead of a “t” at the end of light). In my opinion, you guys have mastered your craft and created a successful project that’s unique and has an intangible transformative power. When I listen to “Ligh+”, I’m floating in an alternate universe where I feel this darkness and uncertainty about myself, but compelled to stay and explore that side of me.

There’s not a lot about you guys online.  Can you share how your project came alive, how you chose your name and what your name represents?

Jordan:  My brother Nick, from little on, has always been into getting the newest toys.  At some point in 2019, a synthesizer was brought to a rehearsal for our other project “The Vitrolum Republic”.   Coming from a childhood of classical music and a band of acoustic instrumentation, it was thrilling to step into a totally different area of sound exploration for our song writing. We all started to get new electronic gear, pushing each other further down the path of pedals, amps, and synths.  I knew nothing other than how to plug them in.  I believe the best creativity comes from limited tools, and an openness to try and fail.  We got to a point during the last days of Dec. 2019 where we converted Benjamin’s house to a recording studio and made 6 demo tracks over the course of a long weekend.  Something poured out of us, that we didn’t know was always there.  Something unique and exciting had been captured.  We slowly edited the tracks and then they sat on the shelf for a few months while we all were busy with our other personal projects (film making, photography, woodworking).  Then the world changed in March 2020.  We were just about to go into tech week / dress rehearsals for a live performance with the Milwaukee Ballet.  Everything was cancelled, so we moved all our gear back to our separate homes for what was the start of lockdown.  We each set up a home studio to keep the momentum alive.

I had just gotten back from Mexico City incredibly inspired by the architecture and artists I met.  My wife Cora speaks fluent Spanish and we came up with a name together.   I thought about what the four of us had in common.  We are all sons – sons of fathers, sons of mothers, sons of… In the Spanish dialect “son” translates to “THEY ARE” and also means “SOUND”.  SONOf seemed to be so specific to us, but also endlessly relatable to everyone.

Me: I’m glad you guys were able to keep the momentum going for your music and I would have never guessed about the origin of your band name – very nice. I mentioned to you that it’s hard to search for SONOf on music platforms and YouTube. What’s the best way for people to find your music?

Jordan:  Well, we’re just getting started. Hopefully the more clicks we get, the easier it will be to find us. 

Please visit:

SPOTIFY:    https://open.spotify.com/artist/7Kc9aE77DbUdlPiRhcqOdP?si=04Dh0sbDRTG7AU4NvimUzQ&dl_branch=1

YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBXIewbimhdV1yP1wvumHzQ

Website:      https://www.sonof.us

BANDCAMP:   https://sonof-music.bandcamp.com/album/sonof

Me:  According to your website, your music genre is FolkTronica. I’ve heard of folk and electronica but can’t quite grasp the combination.  Because I’m very curious, I have been trying to dissect electronic music lately.  I asked you if your music is completely electronic, but you explained that you “start with recording acoustic instruments, but often put them through pedals and effects to explore the sound.”  You mentioned that your previous project “The Vitrolum Republic” was completely acoustic instrumentation. How are you guys finding the journey of changing music styles?

Jordan:  It’s a fun exploration to have one foot in both worlds – really trying to see what can be found through the blend.  The genre of one’s music is a hot topic.  Choosing the wrong labels could mean never finding your true audience for your music.  So, I think there may be a better genre, but it doesn’t exist on platforms these days.

Me: I agree that some music is hard to label. For you guys, maybe “TranscendingTronica” because your music is surreal. I am amazed that musicians all over the world have learned to adapt to the COVID pandemic way of life and have either learned to produce music on their own or produce music remotely by exchanging electronic files.  On your website, I read that you guys “created this EP entirely bypassing digital files between [your] homes during the 2020 quarantine”.  What other challenges have you encountered during this pandemic with respect to your music?

Jordan:  Well, being in the same room at the same time has been a part of our music for a long time.  To completely throw out that factor, opened up a world of creativity through the time in which it took to add parts and try ideas – you could take 8 mins or 8 days. It was like an ancient game I did while in art school called “exquisite corpse”, where each collaborator adds to a composition in sequence, either by following a rule or by being allowed to see only the end of what the previous person contributed.

Me: I can totally see how your game analogy works – a creative exercise in itself. You guys were obviously busy putting together your EP during quarantine. What are your plans post-pandemic?

Jordan:  Planning to release a full album in 2022.  We are currently finishing the shooting and production of music films for our self-titled EP. Check out the videos on our YouTube page, we’re super proud of the caliber of filmmaking on these!

Me: Your videos are incredible. I like to loop the video for Ligh+. You and Nick are actually the second set of sibling musicians that I have interviewed. Twins, Alex and Thomas Arthur of Toronto’s Hideout Legacy are the other ones. Working with a sibling is such a rare and special thing. I don’t think that I could work with my sisters. What’s it like for you guys to work together?

Jordan:  We know each other’s tendencies.  When at our best, we push each other beyond those points to make something better, but also make music for each other.  We have different styles, but we understand where each of us is coming from. I think it makes the collaboration dynamic. 

Me:  So great that you guys can push each other and appreciate your differences. You’re super nice and you can sing and play instruments. It never surprises me that musicians are multi-talented, because playing instruments is a left and right brain thing.

Now, I’m going to confess that I’m a sucker for beautifully crafted wood furniture. Your wood sculpting and furniture making skills are beyond impressive. I need to buy one of your stunning pieces.  I’ll wait until the CAD-USD conversion rate is good lol. You mentioned in our chat that you and Nick are classically trained musicians.  In one of your posts, I saw that you play violin. Do you play any other instruments?  And do you have other hobbies/interests that occupy your time?

Jordan: Haha! I’d love to make you something.  I play a lot of instruments besides violin, just happy I started with the hardest one when I was a kid.  I am a sculptor, and make wood furniture for a living for my company FIDDLEHAMMER.

Pictured above: Bellaphone and bench.

Me: Violin is a challenging instrument – it’s quite a feat to master it. Someone told me that parents of novice violinists and drummers have it the worst and I can appreciate why!

Here’s my usual “get to know you” interview question – if you had to pick three – who would you say are your top 3 favourite musicians?

Jordan:  I think I’d like to name 30, but here goes:

Thom Yorke

George Harrison

Jeff Buckley

Me: I’ve heard of Thom Yorke, but had no idea that he is the leading man of Radiohead until I took a listen to his music. I’ll have to take a listen to the others. One thing that I don’t understand with electronic music…are you able to structure a live performance?

Jordan:  Yes, we are hoping to perform live in the near future.  There is a bit of tech involved, but it will be wonderful to perform all at once together.  We hope to really connect with those who find themselves in our music. 

Me: Well, I think everyone is anxious for this crazy pandemic to end and to be able to enjoy live concerts again. Jordan, thanks again for your time and enthusiasm. It’s been great getting to know you and learning more about SONOf. Everyone – if you haven’t already, give this fantastic band a listen. And don’t forget to show your support by buying, streaming, sharing their music, and buying merch and show tickets. This applies to all musicians. Remember, no musicians = silent world. And to you furniture lovers out there – you can own a beautiful piece of timeless wooden furniture by Fiddlehammer.

Before we wrap things up, is there anything else you’d like to share?

Jordan:  Thank You!

We do all of the work ourselves. We haven’t outsourced a single thing outside our quartet.  The recording, mastering, photography, filming, editing…our vision has potency.  It comes from the heart.  Much love to all who read this, thank you for listening to our music!

—End—

Video for SONOf’s “Ligh+”